Buying a Computer for Business

Helpful guide on buying a computer for Business

Why does it seem like every time you buy an appliance – TV, Washing Machine, Fridge or a Computer they seem to fail at the most inconvenient time when they are just outside the warranty period? It’s so frustrating when things fail when you just want them to work.

As with the entire IT industry, computer’s rapidly change. Over the last few years, we have seen things change from spinning disks to SSD’s (Solid State Drives), more CPU power, smaller form factors, higher resolution monitors, all in one PC’s and much more.

The majority of hardware failures we see in devices these days are Hard Drive failures and less commonly power supply failures. Generally, we see a lot more failures and issues from consumer grade machines that are built to compete mostly on price, verse business grade machines that are designed to be robust.

When buying a new Desktop Computer, Workstation, Laptop or Tablet i treat the purchase like I am purchasing a new lounge. Yes, I mean “lounge”, you know that big comfortable thing you sit on after a hard day at work with your beverage of choice. Why a lounge? Well think about it, you might spend a lot of time on your lounge or you might not, but the time you do spend on your lounge you want it to be familiar, comfortable, reliable and recline when it is supposed to, and last a long time. This is exactly what to look for in a computer.

Think about the following:

  1. How long do you want the computer to last for? A good rule of thumb is 3 years, as this coincides with the warranty period for most mainstream manufacturers (for business grade computers) – That said, I am writing this on a 4-year-old laptop that I love and has not missed a beat but yes, I do have backups and I have backup machines I can use if this fails.
  2. What are you going to do with it? I always like to over spec a little, as I want the best bang for buck and to get the most mileage out of all my new devices. I, like many people, really hate when a computer doesn’t respond or is slow, and my stress levels are important to me so I like to have a high performing computer at all time.If you are doing graphic design, then you will need a machine that can handle what you are going to do with it. It is never a good idea to buy a $500 laptop from a retailer and expect it can handle AutoCAD or Photoshop (or anything really) with any reasonable amount of performance.If you only work on cloud-based products like Xero, Office 365 via the portal and web clients, then you might get away with a slightly less high performing computer because the workload of these applications is mostly done by the servers up in the cloud.
  3. Warranty – You may or may not know, but if you buy a business grade computer from a well-known manufacturer you can generally purchase different types of hardware replacement warranty. You can even get 24 hours a day, 7 days a week 2-hour onsite hardware replacement warranty. This essentially means that the manufacturer will send a tech out to your home or business and repair or replace your device within 2 hours. Not a cheap exercise, but various options are available. Most business’ use 3-year next business day onsite warranty which is much more cost effective. Think about your needs and talk to your supplier about what you need.
  4. Features – Do you ever use the Bluetooth on your computer? What about WIFI? Or maybe you need an Ethernet port or a large amount of storage. Think about what you need and try not to pay for features you will not use. Also think about things like weight, battery life, screen size and resolution.
  5. Hard drives: At the time of writing this (September 2018), I would never again purchase a computer or laptop with an old school spinning disk hard drive. It must be Solid state disk all the way. The difference in performance is huge and not an area to cut a small amount of cost.
  6. Laptop Screen resolution: One mistake I have seen a few times is getting suckered in to buying a laptop with a poor-quality screen and low resolution. Windows 10 is simply not going to work well with a screen resolution that is not FHD (1920×1080) unless you have a screen size under 14 inches. However, if you were to by a 15-inch laptop, with only a HD 1366 x768 screen, you will be trapped, and the only option is to drop it off a cliff (as you will feel like doing) and buy something better.

In conclusion, as someone who sees many different types of PC and specs, your order of priority when buys a machine should be:

1. Specification
2. Warranty
3. Looks
4. Feel
5. Smell
6. Taste
7. ……….
8. Price

AUIT helps many of our customers choose the right hardware for their requirements.  We would be more than happy to have a chat to you about your business computing requirements.  If this is of interest to you,  please contact us at https://auit.com.au/contact-us/